Friday, June 1, 2018

Podcast: Last Child in the Woods





Find the Podcast episode here

“The woods were my Ritalin. Nature calmed me, focused me, and yet excited my senses.” 
 
Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder


“It's a good thing to learn more about nature in order to share this knowledge with children; it's even better if the adult and child learn about nature together. And it's a lot more fun.” 
 
Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

“Time in nature is not leisure time; it's an essential investment in our chidlren's health (and also, by the way, in our own).” 
 
Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

“One of my students told me that every time she learns the name of a plant, she feels as if she is meeting someone new. Giving a name to something is a way of knowing it.” 
 
Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

“and old Indian saying: 'It's better to know one mountain than to climb many.” 
 
Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

“The physical exercise and emotional stretching that children enjoy in unorganized play is more varied and less time-bound than is found in organized sports. Playtime—especially unstructured, imaginative, exploratory play—is increasingly recognized as an essential component of wholesome child development.” 
 
Richard Louv, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder

Find Last Child in the Woods here (aff link):

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